From ThinkAnthem.com

Improving the health of our nation starts with broadening our view of what health means.
That’s why we’re starting a national conversation around whole health and the factors that drive it.

MATERNAL HEALTH DRIVES THE NATION’S HEALTH

Supporting women and families through the maternal health journey is a core part of Anthem's goal to advance health equity for all people.

MATERNAL HEALTH BEGINS BEFORE PREGNANCY, LASTS BEYOND BIRTH, AND HAS FAR-REACHING CONSEQUENCES

FAR TOO MANY FAMILIES HAVE UNMET NEEDS


Prenatal care is crucial for parents and babies—but many people of color and those in rural communities experience multiple barriers to receiving care.

Delivery: 2.2 million+ U.S. women of childbearing age live in areas with no obstetric providers or birth centers.1

Postpartum care sets the foundation for mother and baby to thrive. Yet 1 in 3 pregnancy-related deaths occur up to a year post-birth, 60% of which are preventable.2

Communities with comprehensive care along the maternal health journey build the foundation for healthy children who go on to graduate school, are more financially stable and, in turn, have the skills and resources to raise the next generation. Today, too many families have unmet needs. The U.S. has the highest maternal mortality rate among 11 developed countries.3

To work toward healthier communities, we need to address social drivers of health and support pregnant people with access to:

  • When an expecting mother doesn't receive prenatal care, infant death is 5X more likely.4

  • One of the strongest indicators of a nation's health is its infant mortality rate: the number of babies born alive who die before age one. The U.S. has a significantly higher mortality rate than our international peers— out of 36 developed countries, the U.S. ranks 33.5

  • Death due to pregnancy complications is 3X more likely for Native American women and 4X more likely for Black women.*6

    *Compared to white women.

One of the strongest indicators of a nation's health is its infant mortality rate: the number of babies born alive who die before age one. The U.S. has a significantly higher mortality rate than our international peers— out of 36 developed countries, the U.S. ranks 33.5

By promoting equitable access to healthcare, providing mental health services, and other resources throughout the maternal journey, we can change the trajectory of our nation’s health.